By Ellen Gilbert

A new show at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is reintroducing a master of 20th-century fashion whose name (until now, at any rate) may be unfamiliar to many: Charles James. Cristóbal Balenciaga, the Basque designer and founder of the eponymous couture house in Paris, is reported to have observed, “James is not America’s greatest couturier. He is simply the world’s best.” Christian Dior credited James’s work as the inspiration for his romantic “New Look” designs after World War II.  more

By Jamie Saxon

Photography by David Kelly Crow

Jennifer Esposito has fallen in love with jelly doughnuts — twice.

Growing up in an Italian-American family in the Bensonhurst neighborhood of Brooklyn, actor/entrepreneur Esposito was immersed in a childhood defined by food—and her ravenous hunger for it. She ate everything in sight—bagels, cake, spaghetti, zeppolis at the Italian street fair, jam dot cookies she baked with her sister at Christmas. “Food is very tied to emotion and remembering events,” she says. more

By Anne Levin

New Yorkers gulp billions of gallons of it every day. And when summer’s humidity rises, we immerse ourselves in it. Think of those historic images of tenement kids frolicking in the gush of an opened street hydrant, teenagers plunging into the East River (in the middle of which, incidentally, there are now plans to develop a swimming oasis), and hipsters reclaiming the beaches at Far Rockaway.  more

By Taylor Smith

What initially drew you to the field of sports medicine?

I was a very good athlete growing up, but often injured myself, hampering my career. While at my peak, an ACL [anterior cruciate ligament] injury actually ended any hopes of continuing on professionally, so I decided to dedicate myself to learning how to get athletes back to pre-injury performance.  I didn’t want anyone else to have to give up their dreams because of an injury. more

By Linda Arntzenius

Summertime turns New York City into one big Film Screen with free festivals across the Five Boroughs from Central Park to Tompkins Square in the East Village, and from the Brooklyn Bridge to Coney Island.

Summer movies, like summer books, are rarely desired to stimulate deep thinking. And there’s not much that falls into the profound category in the offerings of the many outdoor summer film festivals in and around Manhattan this year.  more

By Taylor Smith

Saratoga Springs was historically a place of healing. Prior to the arrival of wealthy American barons and European aristocrats, the Mohawk Indians bathed in the naturally carbonated mineral springs that dotted the area. By the 1830s, dozens of springs were outfitted so that tourists could “take to the waters,” hoping to heal all sorts of ailments ranging from depression to diabetes.  more

By Ellen Gilbert

Scholar/Critic Kwame AnthonyAkroma-Ampim Kusi Appiah recently left Princeton University, where he was a member of both the Department of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values, to assume a position as Professor of Law and Philosophy at New York University.  He received both a B.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy at Clare College, Cambridge University.   more

By Jamie Saxon

Photography by David Kelly Crow

There is a certain poetry, an unspoken connection to a deep source of quiet, in wrapping your hands around a cup of hot tea, watching the swell of silent steam swirl skyward, and inhaling the scent of steeping tea leaves—with a clean bite of citrus, a secret whisper of fragrant floral, the earthy green breath of herbs, or the arranged marriage of pungent spices.  more

By Lynn Adams Smith

Images Courtesy of Every Mother Counts

Fashion model Christy Turlington Burns has represented some of the biggest names in fashion such as Calvin Klein and Versace. Most recently, she has devoted much of her time, energy, and passion towards the organization she founded, Every Mother Counts, a campaign to end preventable deaths caused by pregnancy and childbirth around the world.  more